What is Prevent?

Prevent is about safeguarding people and communities from the threat of terrorism. Prevent is 1 of the 4 elements of CONTEST, the Government’s counter-terrorism strategy.

The 4 elements include:

  • Pursue: to stop terrorist attacks
  • Prevent: to stop people becoming terrorists or supporting terrorism
  • Protect: to strengthen protection against a terrorist attack, and
  • Prepare: to mitigate the impact of a terrorist attack

 

What is the Prevent duty?

The Prevent duty is the duty in the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015 on specified authorities, in the exercise of their functions, to have due regard to the need to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism.

The Prevent strategy:

  • Responds to the ideological challenge we face from terrorism and aspects of extremism, and the threat we face from those who promote these views;
  • Provides practical help to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism and ensure they are given appropriate advice and support; and
  • Works with a wide range of sectors (including education, criminal justice, faith, charities, online and health) where there are risks of radicalisation that we need to deal with.

Prevent covers all forms of terrorism and extremism and some aspects of non-violent extremism.
The Home Office works with local authorities, a wide range of government departments, and community organisations to deliver the Prevent strategy. The police also play a significant role in Prevent, in much the same way as they do when taking a preventative approach to other crimes.

Prevent uses a range of measures to challenge extremism including:

  • Supporting people who are at risk of being drawn into terrorist or extremist activity through the Channel process.
  • Working with and supporting community groups and social enterprise projects who provide services and support to vulnerable people
  • Working with faith groups and institutions to assist them in providing support and guidance to people who may be vulnerable; and
  • Supporting local schools, local industry and partner agencies through engagement, advice and training.

Prevent is measured locally and nationally to make sure the Prevent programme provides value for money.

The government has defined extremism in the Prevent strategy as: “vocal or active opposition to fundamental British Values.

Let’s Talk about Prevent, struggling to understand Prevent – take a look at this video produced by Luton Sixth Form Students https://youtu.be/GWrb2B8MzEw

 

For further information go to https://www.ltai.info/what-is-prevent/

What are British Values?

British values are defined as “democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty and mutual respect and tolerance for those with different faiths and beliefs”, and institutions are expected to encourage students to respect other people with particular regard to the protected characteristics set out in the Equality Act 2010.

 

 

 

Why Prostart promotes British Values

  • Enable young people to develop their self-knowledge, self-esteem and self-confidence
  • Enable young people to distinguish right from wrong and to respect the civil and criminal law of England
  • Encourage young people to accept responsibility for their behaviour, show initiative, and to understand how they can contribute positively to the lives of those living and working in the locality of the school and to society more widely
  • Enable young people to acquire a broad general knowledge of and respect for public institutions and services in England
  • Further tolerance and harmony between different cultural traditions by enabling students to acquire an appreciation for and respect for their own and other cultures
  • Encourage respect for other people, and
  • Encourage respect for democracy and support for participation in the democratic processes, including respect for the basis on which the law is made and applied in England.
  • Encourage respect for other people, paying particular regard to the protected characteristics set out in the Equality Act 2010.

 

 

What is Channel?

Channel provides support across the country to those who may be vulnerable to being drawn into terrorism. The overall aim of the programme is early intervention and diverting people away from the risk they may face.

Channel uses existing collaboration between partners to support individuals and protect them from being drawn into terrorism. Who delivers channel? The process is a multi-agency approach with a wide range of agencies and local partners working together to provide support for individuals. Coordinators are usually police officers with the multi-agency panel being chaired by the Local Authority.

 

How does channel work?

Channel works by partners jointly assessing the nature and the extent of the risk and where necessary, providing an appropriate support package tailored to the individual’s needs.
The three key stages of Channel are:

  • Identify individuals at risk of being drawn into terrorism;
  • Assess the nature and extent of that risk; and
  • Develop the most appropriate support plan for the individuals concerned.

 

Glossary

‘Vulnerability’ describes the condition of being capable of being injured; difficult to defend; open to moral or ideological attack. Within Prevent, the word describes factors and characteristics associated with being susceptible to radicalisation.

‘Safeguarding’ is the process of protecting vulnerable people, whether from crime, other forms of abuse or (in the context of this document) from being drawn into terrorist related activity.

‘Radicalisation’ refers to the process by which a person comes to support terrorism and extremist ideologies associated with terrorist groups.

‘Extremism’ is defined in the 2011 Prevent strategy as vocal or active opposition to fundamental British values, including democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty and mutual respect and tolerance of different faiths and beliefs. We also include in our definition of extremism calls for the death of members of our armed forces, whether in this country or overseas.

The current UK definition of ‘terrorism’ is given in the Terrorism Act 2000 (TACT 2000). In summary this defines terrorism as an action that endangers or causes serious violence to a person/people; causes serious damage to property; or seriously interferes or disrupts an electronic system. The use or threat must be designed to influence the government or to intimidate the public and is made for the purpose of advancing a political, religious or ideological cause.

‘Non-violent extremism’ is extremism, as defined above, which is not accompanied by violence.